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UX Strategy

Redesigning business culture and thinking around the customer

by Tim Loo
21st October 2013

We've all been there. The business brief to improve the customer experience is clear. The insight from the customer and the business point to obvious opportunities.

As a team we've designed innovative solutions creating a win/win for the organisation and their customers. And then, like a patient rejecting the life saving transplant from an organ donor, the solution doesn't take. Or worse, they do nothing. In many cases, it's the culture of the organisation that is the barrier to step change improvement. 

In a session at UX Strat 2013 I talked about the role of business culture in customer experience and challenges and opportunities for the UX strategist in redesigning organisational attitudes and thinking around the customer. Here is my slideshare from the session.

If you are having trouble viewing this presentation, try watching it on Slideshare here:

UXStrat 2013 redesigning business culture and thinking around the customer - Tim Loo
Other presentations from UX Strat 2013 can be viewed here.
More content on developing a UX strategy here

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